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One of Australias most tragic WWI family losses with four brothers

One of Australias most tragic WWI family losses with four brothers

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One of Australia's most tragic WWI family losses, with four brothers killed on battlefield

Man standing in foreground middle right, whitewash stone cottage in background left

Headshot of man from 1900s

Soldier head shot

Old fashioned photograph of couple from early 1900s posing on chair

headshot of blonde man from early 1900s

headshot of soldier in Anzac hat

One of Australia's most tragic WWI family losses, with four brothers killed on battlefield -

clockwise from top left Alfred, George Henry, Frederick, John Stout. Inset Wilfred

Four brass medals lined up and one underneath

The Smith Brothers / Digitally altered image

Anzac Harold Beechey suffered more than most during the war - his cross has been placed at the Anglican Cathedral in Perth, Australia

British soldiers

Four enlisted Potter brothers - probably L-R Hurtle, Thomas, Ralph, Edward

Black and white photo of Australian soldier George Slatter dressed in his military uniform.

Top left: George Bogle. Bottom left: Gordon Bogle. Right: Gilbert Bogle MID. Auckland War Memorial Museum Online Cenotaph. Kindly supplied by family .

A US soldier treats a comrade's wound in France in 1918.

First World War: Losing one child in war is a terrible thing, so just imagine losing five - Telegraph

Five sons killed. Then a town's pleas to save the last were heard | World news | The Guardian

Six brothers in arms lost to war

Australian soldiers George Slatter, sitting on a chair, and Jock Pender, standing alongside

Aubrey Lyall Smith (standing) and Francis Hume Smith.

Herbert William Smith (seated) and Frederick Walter Smith.

Sergeant Douglas Page, left, and his brother Sergeant Gregory Page, who were both

Australian soldiers mourning

1917 was a year of great upheaval and heartbreaking loss

Baby Lottie Smith with brothers Herbert, Frederick and Alfred. Picture: Nick Hooper

Five sons killed. Then a town's pleas to save the last were heard

Four enlisted Potter brothers - probably L-R Hurtle, Thomas, Ralph, Edward

Unidentified men of the Australian 5th Division enjoying a smoke and rest by the side of the Montauban road, near Mametz, France, while en-route to the ...

Children welcome German soldiers returning home after the declaration of the Armistice, 1918

Queensland's World War 1 Centenary

A plate from his 1920 Poems by Wilfred Owen, depicting him

German soldiers and Polish girls

Moorhouse family

President Woodrow Wilson is depicted as one of the most tragic figures from the war.

The Sullivan brothers on board USS Juneau: Joe, Frank, Al, Matt, and George.

Men with broken faces

George V and his generals, Buckingham Palace 1918

Arthur William Martin (right), was a Royal Flying Corps bomber pilot

The five Sullivan brothers. From left to right: Joseph, Albert, George,

Children of the wartime evacuation

Kathleen in her VAD uniform in 1915

Alfred Ernest Smith died in Belgium in October 2017.

1917 was one of the worst years in Australian history – suffering heavy casualties on the battlefield and vitriolic division on the homefront.

First World War poetry described the terror of the trenches and the futility of war. Here are fifteen of the best

Edward VIII

The Hamblyn Brothers. '

Five sons killed. Then a town's pleas to save the last were heard | World news | The Guardian

Hundreds of letters, written between brothers fighting in the Pacific during World War II. Almost one a day, for every day of the war.

Joan Beaumont's new book Broken Nation: Australians in the Great War provides a strong insight into both Australia's role in World War One and life on the ...

Top: New Zealanders loading ammunition, France, 1915–18. Daily Mail. Auckland Museum Collection: EPH–W1–1–231. An 18-pounder in action, circa 1917.

Miranda Michels is transcribing the diaries and letters

Foreboding ... Nurse Ada Smith (left) with colleagues at . Picture:

Coach wheel beds in the sunroom at Anzac Hostel Source - Australian War Memorial P03098.04

'Your country needs you': why did so many volunteer in 1914?

Private Owen Stanley Tolman (seated), Private Mostyn Edward Tolman 26th Battalion

A crowd of conscientious objectors to military service during the first world war at a special

Although the centenary year of the ending of WWI has now closed the Trust is pleased to reproduce A Day in the Trenches recorded by Clement Theodore ...

Bernard Montgomery

The Newlove Brothers

World War I British troops Battle of Arras

Six students from Maroon State School hold white crosses in front of school building to honour

My Brother Jack is a fictional account of war's impacts on servicemen and those around them. Collins

1. “A Very Long Engagement” (dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 2004)

Tsar Nicholas II with his wife Tsarina Alexandra and his four daughters and son (Image: PA). Get the biggest Royal Family ...

Harry Moorhouse

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New Zealand troops in the front line at the Somme, 1918. Auckland Museum Collection: PH–ALB–419-H474.

David Absolom

Sgt. Henry Johnson became a hero on the battlefield but faced another enemy when he

World War One: The many battles faced by WW1's nurses

Rarotongan soldiers in the Middle East. Alexander Turnbull Library: 1 /2–066834.

The Watson family, Hartshill c1910 ...

'Your country needs you': why did so many volunteer in 1914?

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'The Mothers', Anti-Conscription Campaign, World War I, Australia 1917. Source - Museum Victoria collection, Cartoonist: Claude Marquet

B&W historical photo of children and adults gathered at picnic in bushland at Maroon.

Dummy army tanks outside the Melbourne Town Hall during a 7th Commonwealth War Loan parade,

By 1917, the infantry was drawn from the four military districts of Auckland, Wellington, Canterbury and Otago.

Ralph writes to family Sept. 28, 1943. “

Ronald Moorhouse

Thousands of Ypres sculptures to commemorate world war one dead. Read more. “

WWI: Love & Sorrow explores the impact of the war on Australian families.

Indigenous soliders in the field during the Boer War

The Battle of Tulagi

Brothers in Arms. '

'The Blood Vote', Anti-Conscription Campaign, World War I, Australia, 1917. Source - Museum Victoria collection

Home Front

World War One: The symbolic reunion of five brothers killed in action - BBC News

Sad Poetry about War

More than 700,000 British men died during First World War. Some 20,000 of these soldiers

The grieving parents – a haunting Kathe Kollwitz sculpture at Vladslo German Cemetery near Diksmuide – and a fitting image for this page.

Battle of the Somme: The mother who lost three sons in WW1